Author Archives: Laure

Classic & Cruising 1965 Chevrolet Corvair

The 1965 Chevrolet Corvair rolled off the production line and onto the roadways of America with smoothed-out body lines, an absent B-pillar and an upgraded 4-wheel independent suspension. Nicknamed ‘The Poor Man’s Porsche”, the ’65 Corvair had more power than previous year’s models and an improved braking system to complement that extra power.

Nationale oldtimerdag Zandvoort 2010, 1965 CHEVROLET CORVAIR MONZA, DM-27-60 pic 2

Image of this beautiful 19665 Corvair by Alf van Beem (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

The Second Generation 1965 Chevy Corvair

The year 1965 was the first year of the second gen Chevrolet Corvair line. Corvairs were in production from 1960 through 1969, with the first generation Corvairs produced from 1960 until 1964. 1965 through 1969 covered the second generation.

Was the Corvair Really Unsafe?

One thing that surprised me, when researching to write this article, is that I’ve always heard the car was taken out of production ‘by Ralph Nader’ because it was unsafe. So, I was surprised to learn that Nader only questioned the safety of the first three years’ models of first generation Corvairs because of the swing suspension installed in them – plus he questioned the safety of the entire auto industry – but the Corvair was singled out by the media. By 1964, an anti-roll bar had been installed in the front end of the cars.

That means, the cars dropped from production, six years later, had nothing to do with the cars in question because the safety issues had been addressed in 1964 and then fully redesigned in 1965 models. Plus, a number of other car models – produced by Mercedes, Renault and Volkswagen used the same type of swing suspension and were not pulled into the safety debate in the same manner.

’65 Corvair Specs

A 140 horsepower engine was installed in the rear of the 1965 Corvair, and it measured 183.3 inches in length from bumper to bumper.

The wheelbase of the ’65 Corvair was 180 inches, and measured 69.7 inches wide and 52.8 inches high.

According to a paint color card shared on Corvair.org, there were 15 available exterior colors for the 1965 Corvair and 7 interior colors.

’65 Corvair Exterior Colors

  1. Black
  2. Light Blue
  3. Maroon Poly
  4. Yellow
  5. Gray
  6. Light Green
  7. Dark Blue
  8. Red
  9. Dark Yellow
  10. Fawn
  11. Dark Green
  12. Turquoise Poly
  13. Orange
  14. White
  15. Ivory

1965 Corvair Interior Colors

  • Ivory
  • Fawn Poly
  • Charcoal Gray Poly
  • Charcoal (I have to confess I’m not clear on the difference between charcoal gray poly and plain charcoal. If anyone has info on it, I would welcome your input.)
  • Red
  • Light Green
  • Turquoise Poly

How Many Corvairs Were Built in 1965?

A total of 235,438 Chevrolet Corvairs were built in the 1965 production run. The breakdown of the numbers for each specific model are:

  • 17,560 Corvair Series 500 4-door hardtop sport sedans
  • 36,747 Corvair Series 500 2-door sport coupes
  • 20,291 Corvair Corsa Series 2-door hardtop sport coupes
  • 8,353 Corvair Corsa Series 2-door convertibles (making this the rarest of the ’65 Corvair models.)
  • 37,157 Monza Series 4-door hardtop sport sedans
  • 88,954 Monza Series 2-door hardtop sport coupes
  • 26,466 Monza Series 2-door convertibles

Resources:

By Laure Justice

Interested in Buying or Selling a Classic Chevy Corvair?

Part of the reason Classic Cars Online US exists is to help connect classic car buyers and sellers, and we’ve added several ways for you to connect, but first, be sure to visit the Classifieds page if you’re in the market to buy or sell classic cars such as the iconic 1965 Chevrolet Corvair.

To be the first to know about our site updates and latest offerings, sign up for the newsletter on the upper right side of this page.

If you would like to connect on social media, be sure to visit and like this site’s Facebook page,  the Best Classic Cars for Sale Online Facebook page or join the Classic Cars Online: Classic Cars for Sale Facebook group.



How Social Media Can Help You Buy or Sell a Classic Car

Social media has become a lot more than just a way to share funny pictures of cats and snapshots of your lunch with your friends. Today’s social media venues can be used to help with selling anything from toothpaste to classic cars, and that’s why you may want to consider using it when you want to buy or sell a classic car.

Using Social Media to Sell Your Classic Car

Using Social Media to Sell Your Classic Car image courtesy of Pixabay

Can Social Media Really Help Me Sell a Classic Car?

Quickly finding a buyer for your classic car means getting your money faster. That’s where social media can really help.

When you put your listing and information about your car in front of other car enthusiasts on social media venues, sure, some of them are just there to enjoy looking at cars – but others are there to find the car of their dreams.

So, if more people see the classic car you’re trying to sell, it’s logically going to sell faster, and it’s far more likely to sell it at the price you want. This means you shouldn’t have to keep lowering your price until you get a buyer, and you will typically find a buyer more quickly.

How Can Social Media Help Me Buy a Classic Car?

Just like selling, when you put your “In Search Of” ad in front of more groups of classic car enthusiasts, you’re far more likely to find someone with the car you’re dreaming of owning in a shorter time period.

If you have a story about why you want the car, like it’s the kind you had in high school, like the car your dad had when he proposed to your mom, or whatever the story is, share the story. The better the story is, the more it gets picked up on social media, and the better results you get.

How Classic Cars Online US Can Help You Buy or Sell a Classic Car

Our social media services include sharing posts to several major social media sites, such as Twitter, Facebook pages and groups, and Pinterest, just to name a few of the spots where we participate in social media classic car groups.

If you choose to pick up our social media services or just want more information, we’ll provide a list of the places your listing will be shared and how many people follow us in our groups at each site as well as how many people are in other groups where we share.

 

Classic Car Valuation Tips

A lot of factors go into classic car valuation, or setting the price on a classic car, including the popularity of the model, the rarity of the car, the provenance or story that goes with the car, and the condition. Gathering all the details to correctly price a car ends up taking a lot of time, and it’s really common for people to assign the kind of prices they see on reality TV shows to their cars only to be surprised and frustrated when they don’t sell. So, take a look at these classic car valuation tips and learn how Classic Cars Online US can help you if you’re looking to sell a classic car.

Classic Car Valuation Tips: 1965 Pontiac GTO

Classic Car Valuation Tips: 1965 Pontiac GTO image courtesy of Pixabay

Researching Classic Car Values

Pricing guides are one of your first sources to look when you’re putting  a price on a classic car, but it shouldn’t be your only source of pricing information. A number of companies put out these guides, like NADA, Hemmings, Kelley Blue Book, and Hagerty’s, just to list a few potential sources. One advantage using pricing guides is that they take condition into consideration. That’s also a problem with them, it’s very easy to misjudge the condition based on a subjective opinion and choose the wrong one. One solution is to be very explicit in regards to the car’s good features and its flaws. Another solution is to compare the results of two or three different pricing guides to see how close the results are.

Adjusting the Price of a Classic Car for Popularity, Rarity, Provenance, and Condition

Understanding and setting a value on these four things (popularity of the model, rarity, provenance, and condition) are the keys to accurately putting a price tag on your classic car when you want to sell it. Read on for the basic details you need to know.

Popularity: Some car models are just more popular than others, and when these desirable models hit the market, they tend to go for higher prices. Here’s the catch, popularity of models tends to go in waves, or trends, and to set an accurate price, you need to know what’s trending. The best way to find this information is simply to do some market research, and that’s one of the services we provide, if you need help with it when selling your own vintage automobile.

Rarity: Rarity is another tricky detail to calculate into a classic car’s price, but it’s an important one. Some cars are obvious in their rarity, but were never especially popular, which reduces their value. other super popular models had a small number of options buyers could select from the manufacturer that made them incredibly rare, even though the model as a whole was produced in the millions. To find this information, you need to go into production run data and find out if your car was rare or not, and this is another service we include in our valuation bundles.

Provenance: Provenance is a little harder to determine in that title information is private in most states, but if you know, for example that Elvis owned the car you’re trying to sell, and you have a picture of him beside it, then your value just went through the roof. Even if your car wasn’t owned by a celebrity, however, the story behind it adds to its value because it’s human nature to enjoy a good story, so if you know the car’s history, don’t hesitate to share it in the listing because it adds value to the car.

Condition: I briefly mentioned condition above, in the section about Pricing Guides, but it’s worth examining a bit more deeply. With condition, you’re going to look at things like mileage, if known, rust, dents, paint quality, interior condition, trunk condition, how it runs – if it runs, and even the condition of the undercarriage. Every detail is important, so ideally, a close inspection is the best thing you can do to protect yourself and to be able to set an accurate price on a  classic car.

How Classic Cars Online US Can Help You With Classic Car Valuation

Our classic car valuation services are designed to give you the information you need while saving you time and effort. At this time, as of 2017, our classic car valuation services include doing the market research for you. we’ll run the specs of your vehicle (based on the condition you describe and any photos you are able to provide) through a minimum of two pricing guides, determine the current popularity of the model, and we’ll research its rarity to find out how many of that particular model were produced.

For more information and prices, fill out the contact form below or send an email to LaureJ@consultant.com and we’ll get back to you right away.

What You Need to Know if You Want to Buy or Sell a Classic Car

The classic car market has changed a lot over the years, and stories of people who got their first muscle car for fifty bucks are pretty much ancient history by today’s standards. Classic car prices have skyrocketed over the past few years, due in part to the “reality TV effect” and in part to the baby boomers who are ready to downsize now that kids are grown and out of the house. Sellers obviously want to get as much as possible for their cars, and buyers obviously want to get the best deal possible, so where is the middle ground? Keep reading to learn what I discovered about today’s classic car market and how Classic Cars Online US can help.

Tips for Buying or Selling a Classic Car: 1958 Lincoln Continental Capri

Tips for Buying or Selling a Classic Car image courtesy of Pixabay

The Reality TV Effect on Classic Car Sales

If you watch TV at all and you’re a car enthusiast, there’s a pretty good chance you’ve seen one of the many reality TV shows that feature classic cars. That means you’ve also probably seen some pretty raggedy old cars go for thousands of dollars and some really pristine restorations and customizations go for multi-thousands of dollars – and so have all of the other buyers and sellers in the classic car market.

This is where The Reality TV Effect kicks in and creates challenges for old car buyers and sellers.

Potential sellers suddenly think of that old rusty car in the barn or back behind the shed and decide, “Hey, $20,000 would be pretty handy right about now. And, there goes that car, listed for sale on an auction site or posted on an online classified ad, like the ones featured here on the site. The thing is, is it really going to sell with that high price tag on it? Maybe, if the right buyer wants it enough, or if it’s a super rare and desirable model, but realistically, probably not.

Potential buyers, on the other hand, see these same shows and they think about their budgets and the reality of their finances – and they end up with the feeling that their dream of owning a sweet ride like the one on the show is never going to happen. Then maybe, just out of curiosity and a bit of hopefulness, they check out the prices on eBay or some other auction site and browse around through some online classic car classified ads, and they see the listed prices and give up on the dream.

So, where’s the middle ground?

  • What the sellers don’t initially see is that first, reality TV is FAKE even though the word “reality” is used to describe the genre, and two, those other cars just like theirs that are listed at exorbitant prices don’t usually actually sell for those prices.
  • What the potential buyers don’t see, is that – again – for the most part, the cars they want aren’t actually selling with any regularity at the prices they’re seeing.
  • What often happens is that sellers lower the opening price a bit at a time, until a buyer finally takes the bait, but a lot of potential buyers give up and drop out of the market long before they ever see the prices begin to equalize.
  • Tire kickers also happen… meaning that people bid or make an offer on the cars thinking maybe they can swing it, then back out of the deal leaving the seller to start all over at square one.
  • Or, sellers decide if they can’t get what the car is worth, according to their fave reality TV show’s example, they will just keep the car and let it rot behind the shed or in the barn.

The Impact of Baby Boomers on Classic Car Prices

According to Car and Driver, the classic car trend that’s related to baby boomers, is that baby boomers are trying to unload their classic cars, creating a crash in the classic car market. (This is actually the opposite of what I expected – I thought I would find that they had expendable cash and were driving prices higher – but not so!)

That sounds like good news for buyers, right? Not necessarily! The boomers selling their classic rides are also operating under The Reality TV Effect. That means, yes, the cars are dropping into the marketplace, but only at the sky-high prices very few people are actually willing or able to pay.

Tie this to the fact that the classic car market is, according to Hagerty Indices for the classic car market and  CNBC, decelerating, though prices remain high: when The Reality TV Effect and The Baby Boomer Effect collide in the classic car market, and this creates a huge gap between expectations and reality, and a lot of frustration for both buyers and sellers.

3 Simple Ideas for Selling Classic Cars Online

When you’re ready to sell your classic car, you want to get the best price possible for it, you want it to sell a reasonable time period so you can get your money, and you want to avoid the frustration of dealing with tire kickers and having to lower your prices over and over again.

  • What’s it really worth? We recommend getting started with a professional valuation of your classic car, and as a side note – that’s a service we provide through this site if you’re interested.
  • How many people will see it? The more people who see your ad, the better chance you have of getting a good price for it, and listing here on the site plus social media promotion is also a service we provide, so if you want to know more, just ask or check out our Services Page.
  • Get great photos: This is especially important when selling a car over the internet. If you’re asking people to buy your car without actually seeing it first, make sure the pictures you share are clear and plentiful, and provide plenty of details.

3 Suggestions for Buying Classic Cars Online

When you’re ready to buy a classic car, you want it to be in the condition described so you know exactly what you’re getting, at a fair price, and just like the buyers, you want a smooth, frustration-free transaction.

  • If you’re shopping on an auction site, check the seller’s rating, read the description, check the photos closely, and ask any questions you have before bidding.
  • If you’re getting the car financed, get pre-qualified before bidding.
  • Check around to see what similar cars have sold for in recent months. Be sure to consider condition, provenance, and the popularity of the model you’re considering, because, for example, a car that belonged to a celebrity is going to go higher than a car that belonged to a non-celeb.

By Laure Justice

Here at Classic Cars Online US, we’re working to build a better way for classic car buyers and sellers to connect. Our goal is to be that sweet spot – that middle ground – where the deals are fair for both the buyers and sellers – and where the transactions go smoothly for both parties. 

Sellers, if all you want is a place to list your car for sale, hop on over to our classifieds page and we’ll get you set up with a free basic ad that gets attention and runs for one week. If you want some help with pricing and promoting your car, we have packages and professional assistance available through the Our Services page to help you get your car sold without all the extra frustration of dealing with tire kickers and guessing at a price based on something you saw on TV. 

Buyers, let us know what you’re looking for and we’ll get your message out to our readers and social media accounts to help you find your dream car. 

The Unusual and Sleek 1968 Chevrolet Corvair

Few classic cars have a devoted following like the 1968 Chevrolet Corvair and with good reason. This rear engine wonder was first nicknamed the “poor man’s Porsche”, for bringing a sense of style and fun to the average family at an affordable price.

Chevrolet Corvair Sedan, Schaffen Diest Fly-Drive 2013

1968 Chevrolet Corvair image by Robrob42 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The ’68 Corvair looked like nothing else on the market at the time, smaller and less curvy than other American made autos, they gave off an aura of foreign durability.

1968 Corvair Color Options

On top of the usual look, the 68 Chevy Corvair color options were plentiful, coming in black, white, red, yellow, maroon, gold, ivory and several other shades of greens, teals, and blues. These included Grotto Blue, Fathom Blue and Island Teal to fit a wide variety of aesthetics.

’68 Corvair Specs

In addition to the air cooled, rear mounted engine, the 1968 Corvair Specs were a little different from other models, with an all-independent suspension and unit construction that allowed it to handle like a sports car. The engines were made to bolt together in 4-, 8- or 10-cylinder configurations. One of which, the 10-cylinder front-wheel-drive setup, was later used in the development of the Oldsmobile luxury car, the Toronado.

The Collectible 1968 Chevy Corvair

The 1968 Chevrolet Corvair remains one of the last affordably priced collector cars available. Its hardy fan base ensures that parts and repairs are easy to come by as well. It has been one of the most discussed and studied cars in the past 50 years. It’s a head turner with its unusual looks for a great price.

References:

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2009-07-12/news/0907090687_1_chevrolet-corvair-motor-trend-heater
http://www.danjedlicka.com/classic_cars/corvair.html
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-23/why-you-should-buy-a-1960s-chevy-corvair-right-now
https://www.gmheritagecenter.com/docs/gm-heritage-archive/vehicle-information-kits/Corvair/1968-Chevrolet-Corvair.pdf
https://corvaircorsa.com/pntcpc68.html

Interested in Buying or Selling a Classic Chevy Corvair?

Part of the reason Classic Cars Online US exists is to help connect classic car buyers and sellers, and we’ve added several ways for you to connect, but first, be sure to visit the Classifieds page if you’re in the market to buy or sell classic cars such as the iconic 1968 Chevrolet Corvair.

To be the first to know about our site updates and latest offerings, sign up for the newsletter on the upper right side of this page.

If you would like to connect on social media, be sure to visit and like this site’s Facebook page,  the Best Classic Cars for Sale Online Facebook page or join the Classic Cars Online: Classic Cars for Sale Facebook group.



1951 Ford F-100: Setting the Bar for the Second Half of the 20th Century

Like the rest of America, the Ford Motor Company looked forward to a bright future following the end of World War II. Ford’s first post-war pickup, known as the F1, was launched in 1948, and given several upgrades for the 1951 model year.

1951 Ford F-1 Five Star Cab Pickup (12763891075)

1951 Ford F100 image by Sicnag (1951 Ford F-1 Five Star Cab Pickup) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

’51 Ford F100 Design Changes

Popular features carried forward from the 1948-50 models into 1951 included a higher, wider cab and seats with increased comfort compared to previous war-year trucks. The 1951 model also sported a redesigned grille featuring a single, curved horizontal bar accented by three vertical struts – somewhat reminiscent of the design of fighter jets of the time. This style was found only on the 1951 and 1952 models, making them easy to distinguish from previous or following years.

1951 Ford F100 Options

The 1951 Ford F100 was available in a range of variations, including pickup, panel van, flatbed and stake truck. The ’51 Ford F100 options included a choice of 95-h.p. 226-cubic-inch six-cylinder or 100-h.p. 239 cubic-inch V-8 engines, dual windshield wipers augmented by a novel foot-actuated windshield washer system, and dual sun visors.

!951 F100 Specs

1951 F100 specs included a 114-inch wheelbase and 6.5 foot bed on a half-ton chassis, with a three-speed stick-shift transmission used for both the straight six or V-8 engines. (Technically, this truck was still an F1 model, as the century designation wasn’t officially applied by Ford until the 1953 model year).

References:

  • http://www.classic-car-history.com/1948-1952-ford-pickup.htm
  • https://www.hagerty.com/apps/valuationtools/1951-ford-f~1-1!2_ton
  • http://angelakrauseford.com/history-of-the-ford-f150
  • https://www.hagerty.com/Articles-Videos/Articles/2017/01/03/jessica-ankney

Interested in Buying or Selling a Classic Ford F100?

Part of the reason Classic Cars Online US exists is to help connect classic car buyers and sellers, and we’ve added several ways for you to connect, but first, be sure to visit the Classifieds page if you’re in the market to buy or sell classic cars such as the iconic 1951 Ford F100.

To be the first to know about our site updates and latest offerings, sign up for the newsletter on the upper right side of this page.

If you would like to connect on social media, be sure to visit and like this site’s Facebook page,  the Best Classic Cars for Sale Online Facebook page or join the Classic Cars Online: Classic Cars for Sale Facebook group.



1968 Ford Mustang Information

First generation Ford Mustangs were produced from 1964 through 1963, dropping the 1968 Mustang squarely within this generation. A few small changes were incorporated into this iconic pony car design every couple of years by the Ford Motor Company.

68 Ford Mustang Convertible

1968 Ford Mustang Convertible image by Bull-Doser (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

New Features for the ’68 Ford Mustang

In ’67, the classic Mustang was made larger, while keeping the same overall design. The expanded size was largely a response to the larger engines, with slightly larger interiors and cargo spaces to match.

The 1968 Mustangs held to the larger size with only a few small design changes. According to The Classic Mustang, the grille was restyled without bars to show a floating emblem, sleeker lines were created by a cleaned-out side scoop, and the block lettering on the side plates was upstyled to elegant script writing. Front and rear side markers were also added to this model, due to the introduction of some Federal regulations that were new for 1968.

1968 Ford Mustang Fastback

1968 Ford Mustang Fastback image by GPS 56 from New Zealand (1968 Ford Mustang Fastback) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Production Numbers for the ’68 Mustang

The 1968 Ford Mustang was wildly popular, with, according to Old Ride, a total of 317,148 produced. The production run breaks down to: 24,376 convertibles, such as the red one in the top image of this article; 42,325 2+2 Fastbacks, like the red and silver striped one featured right above this; and 249,447 hardtop coupes, like the two-tone gold one shown below.

1968 Ford Mustang Hardtop

1968 Ford Mustang Hardtop image by Sicnag (1968 Ford Mustang Hardtop) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

’68 Ford Mustang Color Options

Fifteen different exterior color options were available on these powerful muscle cars.

  1. Acapulco Blue
  2. Brittany Blue
  3. Candy Apple Red
  4. Diamond Blue
  5. Gulfstream Aqua
  6. Highland Green
  7. Lime Gold
  8. Meadowlark Yellow
  9. Pebble Beige
  10. Presidential Blue
  11. Royal Maroon
  12. Seafoam Green
  13. Sunlit Gold
  14. Tahoe Turquoise
  15. Wimbledon White

1968 Mustang Engine Options

Seven different engine options were offered in the ’68 Mustang, with horsepower ranging from 120 in the V6 up to 390 horsepower in the 427 V8 engine.

Interested in Buying or Selling a Classic Ford Mustang?

Part of the reason Classic Cars Online US exists is to help connect classic car buyers and sellers, and we’ve added several ways for you to connect, but first, be sure to visit the Classifieds page if you’re in the market to buy or sell classic cars such as the iconic 1968 Ford Mustang.

To be the first to know about our site updates and latest offerings, sign up for the newsletter on the upper right side of this page.

If you would like to connect on social media, be sure to visit and like this site’s Facebook page,  the Best Classic Cars for Sale Online Facebook page or join the Classic Cars Online: Classic Cars for Sale Facebook group.

By Laure Justice



The Finless and Fine 1961 Chevy Impala

The ’61 Chevy Impala rolled off the production line with a few body changes that defined its look. While still built on the B-Body platform, the 1961 Impala was a touch shorter than the 1960 Impala had been. It had a different roofline, and those iconic Impala fins were shaved down into smooth, rounded tail that curved around to house a set of triple tail lights on each side of the car.

1961 Chevrolet Impala

1961 Chevrolet Impala image by GPS 56 from New Zealand (1961 Chevrolet Impala) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Full-Sized Boxy B-Body Bubble-Top ’61 Impala

The 1961 production introduced the first year for the third generation Chevy Impala. The dramatic shape of the previous year’s models had been toned down into a boxy, sleek shape.

The 119-inch wheelbase left the ’61 Impala 1.5 inches shorter than the ’60 Impala, and the slightly shortened designed added to the boxy lines.

The six-taillight style in the rear was unique to the Impala, and made this a car that stood out from other Chevrolets when looking at it from behind.

A total of five different engine options and five different transmission options were offered, for a variety of possible power-train combos.

1961 Chevrolet Impala Color Options

According to a color chart provided by Impala Classics, fifteen different color options were available for the Impala in 1961, and two-tone packages were also offered, The colors available were:

  • Seafoam Green
  • Arbor Green Poly
  • Jewel Blue Poly
  • Midnight blue Ply
  • Twilight Turquoise Poly
  • Seamist Turquoise
  • Fawn Beige Poly
  • Roman Red
  • Coronna Cream
  • Ermine White
  • Almond Beige
  • Sateen Silver Poly
  • Shadow Gray poly
  • Honduras Maroon Poly
  • Tuxedo Black

The six interior colors available were: Blue, Green, Turquoise, Red, Grey, and Fawn.

1961 Chevy Impala

1961 Chevy Impala image by GPS 56 from New Zealand (1961 Chevrolet Impala) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

1961 Chevy Impala Production Numbers

The ’61 Impala was a wildly popular car, with a total of 491,000 produced in 1961, as noted by My Classic Garage.

79,903 of those were convertible coupes, like the Tuxedo Black Impala Shown at the top of this page.

The rarest model of all was the Impala Super Sport for 1961, with only 453 produced with the Impala SS option package.

By Laure Justice

Interested in Buying or Selling a Classic Chevy Impala?

Part of the reason Classic Cars Online US exists is to help connect classic car buyers and sellers, and we’ve added several ways for you to connect, but first, be sure to visit the Classifieds page if you’re in the market to buy or sell classic cars such as the iconic 1961 Chevy Impala.

To be the first to know about our site updates and latest offerings, sign up for the newsletter on the upper right side of this page.

If you would like to connect on social media, be sure to visit and like this site’s Facebook page,  the Best Classic Cars for Sale Online Facebook page or join the Classic Cars Online: Classic Cars for Sale Facebook group.



Getting to Know the 1966 Ford Mustang

Few automobiles are as iconic as the first generation Ford Mustangs. Also called the “pony car”, Ford had created a whole new class of car known by its sleek styling having a long hood and short deck it would inspire car design for years.

Ford Mustang 2014-09-07 12-59-00

1966 Ford Mustang Convertible image by Berthold Werner [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The Small and Sleek Ford Mustang

First created to fill a niche the designer felt was needed after the larger autos of the 1040s and 50’s, the 1965 and 1966 Mustang pony was designed to be a smaller automobile.

Seating for four: This Mustang had 4 bucket seats, be no longer than 180 inches and weigh no more than 2,500 pounds.

 

1966 Ford Mustang (13011781354)

’66 Mustang hardtop image by Kieran White from Manchester, England (1966 Ford Mustang) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

They had both hard top and convertible styles available in a wide variety of colors.

Cutting Edge Audio Tech for 1966

This model also offered an AM/eight-track sound system, and one of the first AM/FM mono automobile radios ever on the market.

The 1966 Ford Mustang convertible would become the best-selling convertible, selling 72,119 units and the Mustang would also break the 1,000,000 units sold mark that same year.

High Country Special Limited Edition ’66 Mustang

The 66 Mustang also released a series called the ‘High Country Special’ limited edition, 333 of them were sold in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska with only 35 being convertibles.

’66 Mustang High Country Special Country Colors: This series came in three colors that were not offered on the other models, Aspen Gold, Columbine Blue, or Timberline Green. These High Country Special Mustangs remain some of the rarest and most difficult to find cars out there.

References:

  • https://themustangsource.com/timeline/64-66/66/index.htm
  • http://highcountrymustang.com/the-high-country-special-mustang
  • http://www.chazandajinthemorning.com/ajs-car-of-the-day/2017/04/18/ajs-car-of-the-day-1966-ford-mustang-convertible

Interested in Buying or Selling a Classic Ford Mustang?

Part of the reason Classic Cars Online US exists is to help connect classic car buyers and sellers, and we’ve added several ways for you to connect, but first, be sure to visit the Classifieds page if you’re in the market to buy or sell classic cars such as the iconic 1966 Ford Mustang.

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What Is the Difference Between a Pontiac Firebird, a Formula, and a Trans Am

If you’ve ever looked at Firebirds, Formulas, and Trans Ams, and thought they all kind of look alike, you’re right, as far as the body lines go. There are differences, though – mainly under the hood.

1972 Pontiac Firebird

’72 Firebird image by GPS 56 from New Zealand (1972 Pontiac Firebird) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

They’re All Firebirds?

Firebird is the name of the whole lineup of these cars, with Firebird being the basic trim package for the line, and Trans Am and Formula being special trim packages.

One easily spotted feature that tells you if a car is a basic Firebird is right under the hood. Pontiac Firebirds are the six cylinder models – with one caveat.

(Note that in classic Firebirds, which are really what this article is about, a lower horsepower V8 was available as an option, but the lighter suspension of the V6 was still used.)

What Makes a Firebird a Formula?

The Pontiac Firebird Formula has the V8 engine of the Pontiac T/A, but the basic lines a classic Firebird.

Leaving off the extra features that deliver the Trans Am ‘look’ while still providing the powerful V8 engine and Trans Am suspension made the Formula Firebird lighter and more responsive and powerful.

What Makes a Firebird a Trans Am?

With the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, you get a little extra power, courtesy of the V8 engine.

You also get the exceptional handling of an upgraded suspension, plus the Trans Am has some extra body effects and a more luxurious interior so you can enjoy the ride in style.

Interested in Buying or Selling a Classic Pontiac Firebird?

Part of the reason Classic Cars Online US exists is to help connect classic car buyers and sellers, and we’ve added several ways for you to connect, but first, be sure to visit the Classifieds page if you’re in the market to buy or sell classic cars such as the iconic Pontiac Firebird.

To be the first to know about our site updates and latest offerings, sign up for the newsletter on the upper right side of this page.

If you would like to connect on social media, be sure to visit and like this site’s Facebook page,  the Best Classic Cars for Sale Online Facebook page or join the Classic Cars Online: Classic Cars for Sale Facebook group.